Tips for Parents of Special Need Children

Tips for Parents of Special Need Children

This August, many children with Special Needs will be walking down the hall for the first time. For parents of these children, this can be overwhelming as well as exciting. Here are three steps to help parents of Special Need Children prepare for the first day of school.

School  Visit

school hallway

It can be overwhelming starting a new school. If you are the parent of a child with special needs, this can cause anxiety not only for you but the child as well.  Scheduling a visit at the school is an excellent idea. By planning a visit during the summer helps the child to see the school when it is less crowded. It is important for the child to walk down the hallways and class room to get a familiarity of the place.  This tour should include the cafeteria, the library, principal’s office, the nurse’s office as well as the classroom where the student will be if that is available at the time. If the child is switching classes, this schedule should be followed in order as this will be the child routine. Also, knowing where the closest bathroom is also essential.

Picture Schedules
If your child is a visual learner, creating a picture schedule may work.  If possible, two weeks before school starts, go to the school and take pictures of the school, school buses,  and facility. Arrange the pictures in subsequent events. This picture schedule will help the child with an understanding of their schedule in pictures.  This picture schedule can be used while in school.  For example, when to change classes, or when they should go to the bathroom.  The picture should prompt the question “After we do this,then we do this. ”

Supportive Staff.
No one knows children better than their parents. It is important the first week of school to get to know the teachers and supports who will be teaching your child. If your child has an Individual  Education Plan ( IEP) or 504 plan, ensure all parties have a copy of this so they can plan how to serve your child best.  The lines of communication for both sides should be open.  If your child has an aide in the class or a paraprofessional get to know them as well. If your child will need additional resources such as Speech, Occupational Therapy and or Behavioral Services, Speak up. Advocating for your children’s needs is essential to a successful school year.

Be involved

father and daughter doing homework

Parent Teacher Association ( PTA), the school bake sales, Booster Club, whatever activity there is which requires a parent interaction and participation, if you can be active in it, then do it. It shows you support your child’s education. This behavior indicates that this parent is active in their child’s life as well as education.  These activities can be used as social interaction with other parent’s whose child may have similar diagnose, as well as be a resource for additional information which parent who does not participate may not be aware.  Parents who are involved in their child’s education may also get more support. As the slogan goes, ” Membership does have its benefits.”

As a Social Worker who works with the Autistic Community, I often courage parents as well as teachers to encourage their children to be active in school. In school inclusion is imperative to all children and help build self – esteem, friendships and as well as confidence.

As the school year starts, it’s wise to have a plan when it comes to children and education,  If you follow these three steps, your child will be off to a good start. Here is to making this school year the best year.

 

Houston, We  Have A Problem

Houston, We Have A Problem

In this world, creeps, jerks, and butt heads are everywhere, and in the world of individuals with disabilities, idiots are plentiful. It is a fact that persons with disabilities, children and the elderly are more likely to be abused, neglected and exploited. We live in an age where parents are fearful to send their “precious cargo” to school for fear someone will hurt them, and if you are a parent with a child who is non-verbal this fear multiplies. I know parents who do head to toe body checks on their kids before and after a trip to daycare. Obsessive?  Depends on who you ask. The fact that abuse and neglect can happen to their children is a paralyzing fear that settles over parents and caregivers of children with special needs.

For those parents who have made a choice to put their kids in a group home or a residential facility may feel somewhat relieved due to the amount staff a home or facility may have in these places. The fact that the Abuse Hotline phone number is located in multiple locations within the home does nothing for clients if staff cannot articulate to the clients what abuse and neglect are. To them, the Abuse Hotline number might as just be a picture on the wall.

sad kid

What is abuse? According to Webster Dictionary, Abuse is defined by a corrupt practice or custom the buying of votes and other election abuses
2:  improper or excessive use or treatment:  misuse drug abuse
3:  language that condemns or usually vilifies unjustly, intemperately, and angrily verbal abuse a term of abuse
4:  physical maltreatment child abuse sexual abuse
Abuse includes:
Financial (not paying clients’ bills when supposed to, using the money for things that have nothing to do with the client); also sexual, physical, and emotional.

 

People with disabilities are at risk because: 

abused child

They depend on others for basic needs
They are taught to cooperate with ” people in charge” like staff members.
They often live in group settings and cannot choose their roommates or caregivers.

People with disabilities may not report abuse because:
They feel guilty
Do not want to get their abuser in trouble
Do not know they are being abused

Signs of Abuse:
*Bruises, cuts, burns, grip marks
*Any injury that is unusual, unexplained or the explanation does not make sense
*Genital pain, or itching or sexually transmitted diseases.
*Not having enough money in the bank for bills, after monthly deposits, items may be disconnected such as water or power, after they were supposed to be paid, (this applies to individuals who live on their own  and have a Supported Living Coach who helps them pay bills)
*Not enough food in the refrigerator or pantry (this generally for individuals who live on their own and have a Supported Living Coach who helps them pay bills) or clients buying staff items with their own money e.g. groceries, fast-food or giving their money to staff.

As a Social Worker who works for this vulnerable population exclusively, I see clients on a monthly basis. I continue to educate clients on what abuse looks like in ways they can understand asking, ” Who would you tell If I hit you?” I always ask them if I can have some money, and most of the time, they say, “No” In the event in which one of my clients forget, I then re- educate them on the importance of not giving their money to people. I follow-up with a phone call to their circle of supports and explain my finding and re-educate the circle of supports on other ways we as a collective can educate the people we serve. It is important to me as advocate, dedicated educator and supporter of the Special Needs community; our clients are aware and educated on Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation.

For more information about this topic please go tohttp://flfcic.fmhi.usf.edu/

Havercamp, S.M. & Veguilla, M. ( 2009). Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation: How to Protect  Yourself

Summer Camp for Children with Special Needs

Summer Camp for Children with Special Needs

The Summer is right around the corner.  Any ideas on what to do with the little ones this Summer? What about Summer Camp. Finding the right match for your child can be a daunting task, but here are some import things to consider when looking for a camp for the Summer. There are a plethora of options when it comes to Summer Camp options, but how do parents choose what works? Here are some things to consider when looking for a camp.
Objective
What experiences would you like your child to get while attending camp?  Will your child learn to increase his or her social skills? Does the camp have a therapeutic approach such as therapeutic curriculum, e.g.,( Equestrian or Pet therapy)?What about academic? What will the camp do for your child and how do these objectives help with the overall support of the child?
 If your child will be attending a camp which is inclusive based, what are the protocols for when a child has a maladaptive behavior? Are there policies and procedures in place for such things?  Will Specialty service such as Occupational and Speech Therapist be able to come to camp to render services?
Structure

The structure of the camp is critical when considering camp. What type of activities will the child be engaged in while at camp? Are the camp activities sensory based? How will the camp incorporate social play? Will there be times dedicated to alone time in quiet areas? If so is the child allowed to bring his or her items such as  IPAD or Tablets,  and will this be incorporated into the schedule?

kids playing tug-a -war

Logistics
Along with structure, another question to consider is location. How far is the camp from the nearest relative in case of emergency? Does the camp have transportation?  Will there be field trips involved?  Will a parent have to pay the full rate for a kid who only goes half days or are there discounts and financial benefits in place for this?
Medical Issues
Does the camp have a nurse on hand or are staff trained to take care of things such as seizures? Is the camp equipped to handle your child diet restrictions?

nurse

 Lots to consider when picking out a camp. I hope these questions help organize important things to consider when choosing a camp. I hope these tips were helpful.